Sheep Donates Fleece to Honor Rev War Vets

Delpha, or “46”, relaxing on the farm

One of Warwick’s sheep has literally given the coat off her back to support the Friends of Hathorn House educational programs. Delphi, or “Forty Six” as she is officially known, was happy to help out a good cause.

“We put out a call for locally sourced wool so we could demonstrate farm life of Warwick’s Revolutionary War era and its connections to today,”, explains Sue Gardner of the Friends. “Our Living History programs include hand spinning and showing the production of colonial clothing from wool. Dominique Herman, a local shepherd, heard about our need and offered to donate Delphi’s spring ‘haircut’.  We are totally thrilled to accept this generous gift!”

The Friends call the program “Ewe 2 You”, emphasizing that locally made textiles were a part of the patriots’ determination to be independent not only of the English political system but of their products as well—boycotting them as a form of social protest.  “We all can connect with that idea today, because it’s a method people still use to voice opposition or create economic pressure for change,” Gardner adds. “Two hundred and fifty years ago the Non-Importation movement was really picking up steam, thanks to a rabble rouser named Samuel Adams and his Circular Letter of 1768.”

“Forty Six” is a Saxon Merino sheep enjoying relaxing with Herman after retiring in 2017 from the Catskill Merino Sheep Farm, a successful wool farm nearby. While she was working, the ewe also produced several sets of twin lambs and has always been a very special sheep, Herman notes.

A video of the shearing has been posted on the Friends YouTube channel so all can enjoy seeing Forty Six’s “spa day” with Aaron Loux of Aaron’s Shearing.

Video of Aaron Loux Shearing “46”

He carefully removed the fleece while the ewe relaxed, having been through the painless “haircut” many times before.

“You’ll be able to see and experience the whole process of washing and spinning and cloth production this summer at local historical events, or groups can request a visit from our volunteers,” Gardner adds, “Thanks to Dominique and Delphi, we’ve got wool!”

The Friends of Hathorn House is a historical society dedicated to honoring Warwick’s Revolutionary War legacy.  To learn more visit the group’s website at hathornhouse.wordpress.com or email hathornhouse@gmail.com.

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